Pink Madness ^^

28th July 2014

Photoset reblogged from The Writing Café with 641 notes

bookgeekconfessions:

bookaddict24-7:

10 Upcoming Young Adult Books of 2014!

Happy reading!

Don’t get me started on how excited I am for A Thousand Pieces of You…it’s parallel universes!!! I love parallel universes.

Source: bookaddict24-7

28th July 2014

Link reblogged from The Writing Café with 1,653 notes

10 Novels That Are Scarier Than Most Horror Movies →

teawithmadeleines:

bittenandwritten:

vintageanchorbooks:

This list is still so great. 

Yup, these will scare your pants completely off. Invest in a nightlight.

The Turn of the Screw is amazing!!! 

Source: vintageanchorbooks

28th July 2014

Photo reblogged from The Writing Café with 23,297 notes

fashioninfographics:

Visual Shoe Dictionary
More Visual Glossaries (for Her): Backpacks / Bags / Bra Types / Hats / Belt knots / Coats / Collars / Darts / Dress Shapes / Dress Silhouettes / Eyeglass frames / Eyeliner Strokes / Hangers / Harem Pants / Heels / Lingerie / Nail shapes / Necklaces / Necklines /  Puffy Sleeves / Shoes / Shorts / Silhouettes / Skirts / Tartans / Tops / Underwear / Vintage Hats / Waistlines / Wool
Via

fashioninfographics:

Visual Shoe Dictionary

More Visual Glossaries (for Her): Backpacks / Bags / Bra Types / HatsBelt knots / CoatsCollarsDarts / Dress Shapes / Dress Silhouettes / Eyeglass frames / Eyeliner Strokes / Hangers / Harem PantsHeels / Lingerie / Nail shapes / NecklacesNecklinesPuffy SleevesShoes / ShortsSilhouettes / SkirtsTartans / Tops / Underwear / Vintage Hats / Waistlines / Wool

Via

Tagged: writingreference

Source: fashioninfographics

28th July 2014

Post reblogged from The Writing Café with 106,792 notes

stuffman:

image

People have written a lot of touchy-feely pieces on this subject but I thought I’d get right to the heart of the matter

Source: stuffman

28th July 2014

Question reblogged from The Writing Café with 166 notes

Anonymous said: How could i make a character who's a villain but encompasses classical good qualities; courage, honour, chivalry etc?

thewritingcafe:

A lot of villains have classical good qualities. It’s their actions, motives, and morals that make them villains. If your villain doesn’t have at least a few good qualities, they’re not developed enough. Villains can be scared, they can have a code of honor, they can fight for what they believe in.

There’s actually a name for villains like this. They’re called anti villains. The TV Tropes page can give you a lot more information and some examples.

More:

Tagged: referencewriting

28th July 2014

Photo reblogged from The Writing Café with 1,282 notes

pureempath:

i —— foreword

Fairly recently I realized that a lot of writers and US citizens alike don’t really know and fully understand their rights when being arrested/interrogated.  This is mostly a writing guide but if you’re a US citizen this stuff is just useful to know.  Basically, the police won’t tell you most of your rights aside from what you know — but they don’t even explain those.  I hope this helps. 

ii —— being arrested

If you are not served with a warrant, the police can not arrest you.  They can say they have one, but unless they show it to you, you don’t have to cooperate with them.  Upon being arrested, you will be read your rights.
        “You have the right to remain silent.  Anything you say           or do can be held against you in the court of law.  You           have the right to an attorney, if you can not afford one           you will be provided one without any cost to you.”
Every so often the police officers fail to say this to the suspect before the questioning session and usually that results in negative consequences for the officers involved.  What they don’t tell you is that you are allowed to have an attorney present before and during your questioning.  They also don’t tell you that what you don’t say and do can be held against you.  An example of this is, say you’re being accused of murder.  If you sit there expressionless and stoic while they’re telling you that you killed your mother its gonna seem suspicious and they can use that in their favor.  Now, in that same respect if you sit there sweating and vehemently denying it — they can use that against you as well.
Alright, they also don’t tell you that you can accidentally forfeit your ‘right to remain silent’ (fifth amendment right).  If you say “I didn’t kill my mother.” you just gave up your right to remain silent.  They will likely try to provoke you to say something like this that will make you give up this right.  That’s why you want a lawyer present during and before your questioning.

iii —— interrogation techniques

There are a lot so I’ll only be outlining a few major things.  Additionally, this guide is only applicable to lawful interrogations of arrested individuals that are US citizens and do not fall under the “terrorist" category, because military interrogations are quite a bit different.  I might touch on that later.
The room is set up strategically.  In almost every interrogation room, there is a table, two chairs, and a mirror/one way glass.  The suspect sits on one side of the table, a police officer on the other, and the interrogator stands.  The sitting police officer serves to corroborate and support the other police officer, or participate in the good cop/bad cop facade.  The one sitting will usually pretend to be more friendly and try to feed you the age old lie “if you just tell the truth it won’t be as bad”.
The sitting cop will also look for microexpressions and pay attention to body language while the standing cop will generally pace around and give off aggressive vibes to intimidate you, the suspect.
On rare occasions, you can be questioned without being served a warrant.  During these times, you have not been read your rights most likely and you do not have to cooperate.  Sometimes its in your best interest, other times its not.  Either way you don’t have to stay.  On other occasions they are allowed to detain you for up to 12 hours but that is exceptionally rare.
The police officers questioning you will try to make you trip up on your own story.  They do this mainly by trying to speed up the process so you have less time to think and process — the aggressive body language comes into play here.  If you feel threatened you’re more likely to stutter and stumble around than if you have a clear mind.
If they’re having a difficult time getting you to start talking, they’ll ask you harmless questions — questions usually about your family members, your birthday, etc.  These are always things they know already but it gets the metaphorical ball rolling.  Along with that, they can establish a baseline of what your body language is when you’re telling the truth so they know when you’re lying.

iv —— "enhanced interrogation" techniques

As far as the less lawful interrogations go, just keep in mind that all pain would have to start at a minimal level and incrementally increase in intensity to be effective.  You also have to factor in disorientation due to pain and possibly blood loss.  At a certain point in time, your subject will realize they are going to die and there is no going back and they will stop caring.  If they think it could possibly stop, you can get information out of them.  There always has to be the possibility of getting out of it alive.  Or you could also kidnap someone close to them and hurt them in front of your subject if that works.
The most commonly known about method is waterboarding, but its not the most widely used.  The mechanics are basic, actually.  Some sort of material is wrapped over the subject’s head — like a thick canvas material, or plastic — and water is poured over it.  Essentially they feel like their drowning but you are just asphyxiating them.  Its more mental torture than anything else.
Sometimes hypothermia is used, and that is basically just taking the subject’s clothing and putting them in a room about 50* F.  Then every couple of minutes the subject is doused in cold water.
A very common technique is to shake the subject and that is fairly self explanatory, I believe.  Not enough to hurt them, just enough to instill fear that you will.  An open handed slap to the face or abdomen is also used.  Punching is usually not employed by the government because it harms the prisoner, but if you’re talking about another country or a rogue operative, maybe a drug dealer — who knows.
Sometimes it is as simple as making the subject stand in one place in the same position for hours.  It causes intense strain on the muscles and is usually quite effective.

v —— end thoughts

I could have gotten a lot more in depth on a lot of this but I felt I covered it enough to give a general idea.  I do hope this helps people write these sort of things more accurately, or maybe even if they get into a scuttle with law enforcement (which I hope does not happen).  If you have any questions, comments, or anything additional that I should add, don’t hesitate to contact me.

pureempath:

i —— foreword

Fairly recently I realized that a lot of writers and US citizens alike don’t really know and fully understand their rights when being arrested/interrogated.  This is mostly a writing guide but if you’re a US citizen this stuff is just useful to know.  Basically, the police won’t tell you most of your rights aside from what you know — but they don’t even explain those.  I hope this helps. 

ii —— being arrested

If you are not served with a warrant, the police can not arrest you.  They can say they have one, but unless they show it to you, you don’t have to cooperate with them.  Upon being arrested, you will be read your rights.

        “You have the right to remain silent.  Anything you say
          or do can be held against you in the court of law.  You
          have the right to an attorney, if you can not afford one
          you will be provided one without any cost to you.”

Every so often the police officers fail to say this to the suspect before the questioning session and usually that results in negative consequences for the officers involved.  What they don’t tell you is that you are allowed to have an attorney present before and during your questioning.  They also don’t tell you that what you don’t say and do can be held against you.  An example of this is, say you’re being accused of murder.  If you sit there expressionless and stoic while they’re telling you that you killed your mother its gonna seem suspicious and they can use that in their favor.  Now, in that same respect if you sit there sweating and vehemently denying it — they can use that against you as well.

Alright, they also don’t tell you that you can accidentally forfeit your ‘right to remain silent’ (fifth amendment right).  If you say “I didn’t kill my mother.” you just gave up your right to remain silent.  They will likely try to provoke you to say something like this that will make you give up this right.  That’s why you want a lawyer present during and before your questioning.

iii —— interrogation techniques

There are a lot so I’ll only be outlining a few major things.  Additionally, this guide is only applicable to lawful interrogations of arrested individuals that are US citizens and do not fall under the “terrorist" category, because military interrogations are quite a bit different.  I might touch on that later.

The room is set up strategically.  In almost every interrogation room, there is a table, two chairs, and a mirror/one way glass.  The suspect sits on one side of the table, a police officer on the other, and the interrogator stands.  The sitting police officer serves to corroborate and support the other police officer, or participate in the good cop/bad cop facade.  The one sitting will usually pretend to be more friendly and try to feed you the age old lie “if you just tell the truth it won’t be as bad”.

The sitting cop will also look for microexpressions and pay attention to body language while the standing cop will generally pace around and give off aggressive vibes to intimidate you, the suspect.

On rare occasions, you can be questioned without being served a warrant.  During these times, you have not been read your rights most likely and you do not have to cooperate.  Sometimes its in your best interest, other times its not.  Either way you don’t have to stay.  On other occasions they are allowed to detain you for up to 12 hours but that is exceptionally rare.

The police officers questioning you will try to make you trip up on your own story.  They do this mainly by trying to speed up the process so you have less time to think and process — the aggressive body language comes into play here.  If you feel threatened you’re more likely to stutter and stumble around than if you have a clear mind.

If they’re having a difficult time getting you to start talking, they’ll ask you harmless questions — questions usually about your family members, your birthday, etc.  These are always things they know already but it gets the metaphorical ball rolling.  Along with that, they can establish a baseline of what your body language is when you’re telling the truth so they know when you’re lying.

iv —— "enhanced interrogation" techniques

As far as the less lawful interrogations go, just keep in mind that all pain would have to start at a minimal level and incrementally increase in intensity to be effective.  You also have to factor in disorientation due to pain and possibly blood loss.  At a certain point in time, your subject will realize they are going to die and there is no going back and they will stop caring.  If they think it could possibly stop, you can get information out of them.  There always has to be the possibility of getting out of it alive.  Or you could also kidnap someone close to them and hurt them in front of your subject if that works.

The most commonly known about method is waterboarding, but its not the most widely used.  The mechanics are basic, actually.  Some sort of material is wrapped over the subject’s head — like a thick canvas material, or plastic — and water is poured over it.  Essentially they feel like their drowning but you are just asphyxiating them.  Its more mental torture than anything else.

Sometimes hypothermia is used, and that is basically just taking the subject’s clothing and putting them in a room about 50* F.  Then every couple of minutes the subject is doused in cold water.

A very common technique is to shake the subject and that is fairly self explanatory, I believe.  Not enough to hurt them, just enough to instill fear that you will.  An open handed slap to the face or abdomen is also used.  Punching is usually not employed by the government because it harms the prisoner, but if you’re talking about another country or a rogue operative, maybe a drug dealer — who knows.

Sometimes it is as simple as making the subject stand in one place in the same position for hours.  It causes intense strain on the muscles and is usually quite effective.

v —— end thoughts

I could have gotten a lot more in depth on a lot of this but I felt I covered it enough to give a general idea.  I do hope this helps people write these sort of things more accurately, or maybe even if they get into a scuttle with law enforcement (which I hope does not happen).  If you have any questions, comments, or anything additional that I should add, don’t hesitate to contact me.

Tagged: writinginterrogation

Source: pureempath

28th July 2014

Photo reblogged from The Writing Café with 798 notes

thewritingcafe:


Because comic sans always screams fun.
I’ve written a guide on making a map before and there are tons of tutorials in my map tag, but I’m going to make a guide for people who, like me, mostly just click stuff through trial and error or who aren’t that great at using photoshop. In that tag you can also find links to brushes for mountains, trees, castles, etc. and some information on geography.
I’ll show you how to get the effect in the above photo and how to generate different maps for your fictional world using the render cloud feature. I use cs2 to make maps. I downloaded it a long time ago, so I don’t remember where I got it, but there are tons of free versions out there if you look for them.
Read More

thewritingcafe:

Because comic sans always screams fun.

I’ve written a guide on making a map before and there are tons of tutorials in my map tag, but I’m going to make a guide for people who, like me, mostly just click stuff through trial and error or who aren’t that great at using photoshop. In that tag you can also find links to brushes for mountains, trees, castles, etc. and some information on geography.

I’ll show you how to get the effect in the above photo and how to generate different maps for your fictional world using the render cloud feature. I use cs2 to make maps. I downloaded it a long time ago, so I don’t remember where I got it, but there are tons of free versions out there if you look for them.

Read More

Tagged: writingmapworldcreate

28th July 2014

Photo reblogged from Naamloos with 149 notes

musefraisedesbois:

//

musefraisedesbois:

Source: musefraisedesbois

28th July 2014

Photoset reblogged from come with me with 2,174 notes

Source: johnnydepps

28th July 2014

Photo reblogged from Naamloos with 22 notes

musefraisedesbois:

Blue birdia

//

musefraisedesbois:

Blue birdia

Source: musefraisedesbois